Let Them Eat Cake!
Jun
24
Jun 25

Let Them Eat Cake!

  • 230 Bishopsgate London, EC2M 4QH United Kingdom

Let Them Eat Cake! is a delicious one to one experience slicing the history of feasts and famines across the British Empire. Be lovingly hand-fed a slice of cake by George Chakravarthi as Marie Antoinette!

 

Lady Malcolm’s Servants’ Ball was a notorious party on London’s queer scene in the 1920s & 1930s.

Nearly a century later, Duckie are re-enacting the ball at the Bishopsgate Institute as an homage to the lives of those that came before us.

Negrophilia! (St Helens)
Nov
20
Nov 21

Negrophilia! (St Helens)

  • The Citadel Arts Centre

Negrophilia is a comprehensively documented Euro-American fascination with African and Black diasporic cultures. The allure continues to be prevalent in European cultures through other forms and guises, from academia to Art and popular culture. This performance is an exploration of the Parisian avant-garde culture of the 1920s and its fascination with Africanism (Negrophilia), whilst also referencing Hollywood cinema of the same era such as I Walked With A Zombie, Cat People and King Kong, surrealist artists such Man Ray and Méret Oppenheim, and Darwin’s illustrations of evolution, encapsulated through the image and political discourses of Josephine Baker.

(Mistress of melody Miss Amy Lamé introduces a hit parade of short sharp performance and in-between the acts plays pure pop, rock’n’roll and northern soul.)

 

Negrophilia! (London)
Nov
14
9:00 pm21:00

Negrophilia! (London)

  • Chelsea Arts Theatre

Negrophilia is a comprehensively documented Euro-American fascination with African and Black diasporic cultures. The allure continues to be prevalent in European cultures through other forms and guises, from academia to Art and popular culture. This performance is an exploration of the Parisian avant-garde culture of the 1920s and its fascination with Africanism (Negrophilia), whilst also referencing Hollywood cinema of the same era such as I Walked With A Zombie, Cat People and King Kong, surrealist artists such Man Ray and Méret Oppenheim, and Darwin’s illustrations of evolution, encapsulated through the image and political discourses of Josephine Baker.                                                                

Negrophilia! was curated by the Live Art Development Agency (London) as part of Just Like a Woman, for Chelsea Theatre, 2015

 

Negrophilia! (New York)
Oct
24
7:00 pm19:00

Negrophilia! (New York)

  • Abrons Arts Center

Negrophilia is a comprehensively documented Euro-American fascination with African and Black diasporic cultures. The allure continues to be prevalent in European cultures through other forms and guises, from academia to Art and popular culture. This performance is an exploration of the Parisian avant-garde culture of the 1920s and its fascination with Africanism (Negrophilia), whilst also referencing Hollywood cinema of the same era such as I Walked With A Zombie, Cat People and King Kong, surrealist artists such Man Ray and Méret Oppenheim, and Darwin’s illustrations of evolution, encapsulated through the image and political discourses of Josephine Baker.

Negrophilia! and other works was curated by the Live Art Development Agency (London) as part of Just Like a Woman, for Abrons Arts Centre (New York, USA), 2015.

Barflies: triptych Polaroid prints - Limited Edition
Apr
30
Apr 29

Barflies: triptych Polaroid prints - Limited Edition

Barflies (video installation 2003) is a seminal three-screen installation performed by Chakravarthi offering representations of the different investments in femininities embodied by Transvestites/Cross dressers, the pleasures, fears and dangers of being in public 'en femme' and the particular dialectic relationship they have with the heterosexual male. Barflies was screened for most recently for LADA's Just Like A Woman programme for the City of Women Festival (Slovenia, 2013).

LADA marked its 15th anniversary in 2014, which it celebrated with a series of initiatives across the year. The anniversary activities provided an opportunity to reflect on the seismic shifts in Live Art practices and discourses that had taken place since 1999 through the lens of the Agency and its work.

For LADA’s 15th Anniversary limited edition series, George Chakravarthi has produced a mounted triptych of prints derived from his Barflies project. 

Link

Thirteen
Apr
29
May 30

Thirteen

  • Globe Gallery

Gallery open Wednesday to Saturday 12 PM - 5 PM

Evoking death, drama and identity, George Chakravarthi re-imagines thirteen characters in Shakespeare’s plays who met their ends through suicide.

This is the second time Thirteen has been shown outside the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon, where the exhibition was originally shown.

Thirteen is a series of powerful self-portraits presented as light boxes in which Chakravarthi assumes the roles of some of Shakespeare's doomed characters, including Mark Antony, Othello, Lady Macbeth, Ophelia, Cleopatra, and Romeo and Juliet. In doing so, Chakravarthi explores themes of ambiguity of gender and masking of identity, often central to Shakespeare’s plays.

Chakravarthi says, “Changing perceptions of suicide seemed fertile and contemporary territory for exploration, especially in the context of our current political history and the direct connection to Shakespeare's representation of death as an act of valour, terror, passion and love.”

Using himself as a starting point, Chakravarthi worked behind the scenes with the Royal Shakespeare Company’s costume department to dramatically reconstruct his identity and take on the guise of each character. Each image is layered with multiple textures and surfaces drawn from diverse sources including cobwebs, mould and precious stones. The result of this painstaking process is a series of complex jewel-like images mounted in light boxes, which glow with colour and rich texture, recalling stained glass, monuments or tombs.

The Ambidextrous Universe
Mar
4
May 29

The Ambidextrous Universe

  • The House of St Barnabas

 

 

part of The Collective

Western culture has long associated the left with evil, a belief that has been reinforced by Christianity. Though it is difficult to pinpoint any specific reference to this in the Bible, the devil is depicted as being left-handed, saints are said to have refused feed from their mother’s left breast and painters of the Last Judgment depict God pointing to heaven with His right hand and to hell with His left. Eastern religions/spiritual imagery, mostly, tend to focus on union, equilibrium, balance and symmetry, aspiring to an ambidextrous philosophy.

Algorithmic, fractal and recalling spiritual architecture, this new work, (part of a new, ongoing visual research, ‘The Ambidextrous Universe’), examines the deterioration of the body caused by disease, the blossoming of recovery and the alleviation of epiphanies.

The House of St Barnabas

1 Greek Street

London W1D 4NQ

By appointment only: reservations@hosb.org.uk

Link